Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes

FOXNews.com – Justice Department Inspector General Stripped of Investigative Power

In response to a Republican lawmaker who requested a probe into dismissed complaints against the New Black Panther Party, the Justice Department’s Inspector General said he has been unable to investigate because he lacks the authority.

Justice Department Inspector General Glenn A. Fine wrote in a four-page letter to Rep. Frank Wolf of Virginia that Congress stripped him of the power to investigate all alleged wrongdoings within his department.

So he has been kept in place so the Justice Department can say they have an Inspector General. But they have removed his investigative powers to keep him from actually doing anything?

Why would Congress do this? Who included this in a bill and at whose behest? And why have those who knew about this kept it so quiet?

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes” indeed.

The essential problem was posed by Plato in The Republic, his work on government and morality. The perfect society as described by Socrates, the main character in this Socratic dialogue, relies on laborers, slaves and tradesmen. The guardian class is to protect the city. The question is put to Socrates, “Who will guard the guardians?” or, “Who will protect us against the protectors?” Plato’s answer to this is that they will guard themselves against themselves. We must tell the guardians a “noble lie”.[1] The noble lie will assure them that they are better than those they serve and it is therefore their responsibility to guard and protect those lesser than themselves. We will instill in them a distaste for power or privilege; they will rule because they believe it right, not because they desire it.

But what if they just leave the watchmen in place, but remove their powers?

Cui bono?